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The wild mustard flowers of Israel

The wild mustard is growing yellow and everywhere in Israel at the moment. But not the kind of mustard that you eat with ketchup on your hotdog! Wild mustard as in wild mustard plants! :)

I am talking about Sinapsis Arvensis, a tiny yellow flower that grows in masses in fields, along road sides and abandoned building sites. Up close the wild mustard flower does not look like much - a bit on the puny side actually. But just come across a field filled with mustard flowers and you will be enchanted - just as I am every spring.



These flowers are just so YELLOW and they have a lovely heady smell. Some describe their scent as pungent but I would rather describe it as aromatic! :) Our long wet winter has helped the wild mustard to grow everywhere.

The flowers usually grow to about waist-high but I have walked through fields where the mustard flowers touched my shoulders. One magical spring day, I was hiking around the Sea of Galilee to the archeology site at Capernaum. The wild mustard flowers obscured my view nearly all the way but I felt as if I was walking in this yellow-green parallel universe that smelled incredibly nice.

We had so much rain this winter, I am sure that the wild mustard flowers are going to grow tall again. The days are slowly becoming warmer and it hasn't rained for a few days. Soon the summer will be with us and the mustard mustard flowers will dry out and only the photos will be a reminder that they every existed.

You will probably think that I am a bit crazy to go on about something that is basically, well...a weed. But go for a walk, smell the wild mustard and hear the bees buzzing about. And if you do not live in Israel - now is a great time to visit. Spring in Israel is magic!

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Comments

  1. Reading your blog presented a breathe of fresh air for me as I've been longing to experience those quaint moments of peace and solitude in that good old country. nefesh b'nefesh moving israel

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for your kind words Patrick. Spring in Israel is indeed wonderful.

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  2. I really appreciated this article. I have been searching for a genuine description of mustard plants (not a scientific one) for my writing, and yours helped me immensely...in addition, you have lifted my heart with a breath of beauty in your words. Thank you for the peaceful, gentle vision.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are very welcome! I am glad my words was of help :)

      Delete

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