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Stepping back in time in Ajami, Tel Aviv




In a not-so-recent photo walk I was privileged to explore the beautiful, yet shabby neighbourbood of Ajami.

This old neighbourhood in Tel Aviv is probably the best contender elegant shabby chic that I have ever seen. Various photo and tourists group often meet up to explore this old neighbourhood and if you are one of them, I highly recommend that you come equipped with a camera or even sketch book!


The neighbourhood was established by Maronite Christians at the end of the 19th century. Many of these residents made their fortunes in trade and built lovely decorated mansions surrounding hidden courtyards. It was also the first neighbourhood in Israel by the way to be connected to the electric grid in 1923.

Today the old mansions are still standing but they are neglected and run-down. And it is now known as one of the lowest-income neighbourhoods in Tel Aviv-Jaffa. Ownership of the many old mansions are in dispute, leading to even more neglect.


Most of the old mansions have been neglected.

You can read a bit more of the history of this once elegant spot here.

But let's explore Ajami a bit more with these photos:
A smiling lady. Note the drying garlic and the amulet against the evil eye.

A porch made to give shade from the hot Israeli sun.
The Lion of Zion grinning above the entrance of a door.
Friday morning shopping
Symmetry in Ajami

Window decoration
Ma'agen David window

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