Skip to main content

Posts

Remembering the Fallen Soldiers

or "The Meaning of the number  22, 993 in Israel " In the Commonwealth fallen soldiers are remembered by buying and wearing a paper poppies but here in Israel people fly the Israeli flag. Copyright: comedynose In South Africa (and other commonwealth countries) fallen soldiers are honored on  Remembrance Day , usually on the 11th of November. Ceremonies are held in a few of the large cities and small paper poppies are sold to raise funds for military veterans in need.

Haveil Havalim # 356

"Vanity of vanities, saith the Preacher, vanity of vanities; all is  vanity." Kohelet 1  (Ecclesiates) 

Remembering the Holocaust - The Saddest Day in Israel

People all have their own private saddest days. They may have had their house foreclosed, had to bury their parents or even a child. So maybe I am not speaking for all Israelis when I say that Holocaust Day is the saddest day in Israel. But it really feels like it.

The Judas Tree of Israel

A Purple Judas tree A month or so after the almond blossoms are gone, the beautiful flowers of the Judas tree show up in loud purple glory in Israel.

Sending a Child to the Army

Copy right: Goldberg  Some Israeli soldiers - just look how young they are. This week I helped friends of mine give a send-off party for their 18-year old son. He wasn't going to university or work in another city. No, he was off to join the Israeli army.

The wild mustard flowers of Israel

The wild mustard is growing yellow and everywhere in Israel at the moment. But not the kind of mustard that you eat with ketchup on your hotdog! Wild mustard as in wild mustard plants! :) I am talking about  Sinapsis Arvensis , a tiny yellow flower that grows in masses in fields, along road sides and abandoned building sites. Up close the wild mustard flower does not look like much - a bit on the puny side actually. But just come across a field filled with mustard flowers and you will be enchanted - just as I am every spring.

Are Israelis Rude?

Photo by  Ken Bosma   Israelis are often described as prickly pears - thorny  on the outside but sweet on the inside! It is the first day in an ulpan (Hebrew class) in Israel and one of the new immigrants raises his hand and ask: "Excuse me teacher, but can you please tell me how to say 'Please', 'Thank you' and 'I apologize' in Hebrew." The Israeli teacher (clearly baffled) looks at him for a while and then asks, "Why?" One does not hear the 'magic words' too often here in Israel. And yes, Israelis can also be quite rude. Let me count  the ways: They elbow you out of loosely-formed "queues" They steal parking spaces right in front of you If When they get mad they yell and/or swear loudly Their dogs do its 'business' in front of your house and nobody picks it up They love to interrogate you about your salary, religion or why you aren't married. And if you are married they ask why you do not have children. Or