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Haveil Havalim #383

A rose for Ricki "Vanity of vanities, saith the Preacher, vanity of vanities; all is  vanity."  Kohelet 1  (Ecclesiates)  Yup, it is my turn again to host  Haveil Havalim  - a carnival of Jewish and Israeli blogs.The Haveil Havalim blog carnival was founded by  Soccer Dad  and every week a different blogger takes a turn to host a weekly collection of blog posts. The name "Haveil Havalim" means "Vanity of the Vanities" and is taken from the book Ecclesiates in the Tanach (the Jewish Bible).  If you blog about Israel or Jewish-related subjects, please feel free to join the  Haveil Havalim   Facebook group   or go and have a look at the  Haveil Havalim website . I enjoy hosting this carnival. All the different bloggers who participate in  Haveil Havalim   seems to represent the wonderful diversity of people who lives in Israel. There hardworking bloggers who write nearly every day (I am not of them !) bloggers who like to write about politics, an

Yom Kippur in Israel

http://www.flickr.com/photos/ronalmog/ When you look for images on the Internet for Yom Kippur in Israel - you will either see photos of empty highways, cycling children or masses of praying religious Jews dressed in white. And yes, I guess that what a lot of people experience during Yom Kippur. But it so much more than that. Yom Kippur is the day of Atonement and one can say that the entire previous year leads up to this single day. In the days following up to Yom Kippur, Jews are supposed  to reflect over the previous year, look at what they have done wrong and set it right. Family and friends are asked for forgiveness for any hurts that you may have caused them, grudges are finally put away and everyone tries to enter to new year with a clean a slate as possible. According to Jewish tradition, God's writes down each person's destiny for the new year during Rosh haShanah . At Yom Kippur the verdict is finally closed and sealed. Just before and after Yom Kippur people wi

New Year in Israel

Pomegranates are eaten at Rosh haShana to symbolize the wish that people's good deeds will be as plentiful as the  seeds of a pomegranate. In Israel the new year is celebrated twice. On the eve of December 31st, like the rest of the world, and on Rosh haShana - the Jewish "Head of the Year". But actually only secular Jews go and party on the 31st of December. And usually it is the kind of people who needs only half a reason for a party! The 1st of January is not a holiday, so the most of us just see the new calender year in by watching a few news reports from around the world. The real Israeli new year takes place on Rosh HaShana. Usually in September, a few weeks after the children have gone back to school. The entire country takes a break for two days and one spends a LOT of your time eating food! Many of the food stuffs that are eaten are sweet. To symbolize the hope that the coming year will be a sweet year. My favourite Rosh haShana dish is apples dipped i

Becoming a Hummus Connoisseur

Hummus plays a large role in the Israeli diet. Wherever you may find yourself eating something, from a picnic at the beach, an end-of-year party or a conference in a smart hotel - there you are sure to find a plate of hummus. There are even restaurants in Israel that ONLY serve hummus and no other kind of food. These restaurants, known as a "hummusia" in Hebrew are very popular and Israelis often argue about which hummusia serves the best hummus. Some people like their hummus with cooked fava beans and/ or boiled chickpea kernels, others insist on a boiled egg in their plate (not me!) and others just want a sprinkling of paprika and a dash of  olive oil. Which ever way you like to eat it, hummus is very healthy, very filling and a great vegetarian dish. It is made out mashed chickpeas (garbanzo beans), olive oil and seasoning. A good plate of hummus MUST be accompanied by a few decent pitot (plural for pita bread). One eats the hummus by breaking of a piece of the p

Haveil Havalim Edition 367

"Vanity of vanities, saith the Preacher, vanity of vanities; all is  vanity."  Kohelet 1  (Ecclesiates)  I have the honor again to host  Haveil Havalim  - a carnival of Jewish and Israeli blogs.The Haveil Havalim blog carnival was founded by  Soccer Dad  and every week a different blogger takes a turn to host a weekly collection of blog posts. The name "Haveil Havalim" means "Vanity of the Vanities" and is taken from the book Ecclesiates in the Tanach (the Jewish Bible).  If you blog about Israel or Jewish-related subjects, please feel free to join the  Haveil Havalim   Facebook group   or go and have a look at the  Haveil Havalim website . Batya Medad at Shiloh Musings says   why she thinks the university center in Ariel should be named the Ariel University. And in Me-ander she thinks about her aunt's funeral in New York while she is at a memorial service in Israel in Being Two Places at Once . Susan Esther Barnes at the Jewish Journal.com

How to Survive the Israeli Summer

Well, maybe survive is too strong a word... one does not  survive  the Israeli summer heat. It is more like you barely manage to grasp on to life while your eyeballs are being melted to the back of skull. You are constantly tired because it is too hot to sleep and your children are cranky because they are all hot and bothered. And if you DARE put a bare foot on an Israeli beach - then it is, well then it is like an instant barbecue!    Eating large ice creams will definitely help you to survive the Israeli summer. Okay, I exaggerate. But only a little bit. It is HOT in Israel in the summer and everybody is more irritable than unusual. And yes, Israelis can be more  irritable than unusual :) So, if you are thinking of coming to visit Israel in the summer months (or already live in Israel) here are a few tips on how to survive the Israeli summer. 1. Buy the largest, most expensive air conditioner that you can afford. Switch it on and do NOT leave the house! If you are a touri

The Glass Museum at Kibbutz Nachsolim

Kibbutz Nachsolim is right next to Hof Dor (Dor beach), one of my favorite beaches here in Israel. I usually walk right past the kibbutz, straight into the clear (and wonderfully cool) Mediterranean sea! The Glass Factory Museum  But a while ago I had the chance to visit the glass museum on the kibbutz and I was surprised at the amazing treasures housed in there. It is not just about glass - even though glass was the reason the building was originally built. The museum took its name from an extremely well-equipped and state-of-the-art glass bottle factory that the Baron Rothschild had built in 1891 right next to the beach. The glass factory was to supply bottles to the wineries in Zichron Yaakov using the sand from the nearby beach. The chemist Meir Dizengoff ( later the first major of Tel Aviv's) oversaw the bottle making process. Not a bad idea one might think - but nobody had bothered to check the sand's suitability to be made into bottles. The glass  factory did